A Walk From Porthgain to Abereiddi on The Pembrokeshire Coast Path

Porthgain walk
Circular Walk from Porthgain

Yesterday was one of the nicest days we have had for a while so we decided to go for a walk choosing a coastal walk because of the possibility of mist in the mountains.

To open this walk in Google Earth click here

This walk is slightly further north on the coastal path than the previous one and is about 45 miles from our house. Porthgain is a pretty village that was once a granite quarrying area and industrial harbour in the early 1900s. At the beginning of the walk we walked past the brick hoppers on the south side of the harbour and climbed some steep steps at the side of white building to reach the coastal path. The brick hoppers were used to store crushed granite before it was shipped. There are many ruined quarry buildings to explore at the start of the walk.

beach
Another view of Traeth Llyfn

We then continued along the path with the watch tower at Abereiddi in sight. Along this first section are high dramatic cliffs.

beach
The Beach at Traeth Llyfn

We then came across the tiny beach at Traeth Llyfn which is reached by some steps. This is a stunningly beautiful remote beach with sand and rocks making it ideal for some photographs and a very pleasant lunch stop. There are very strong currents in the sea here and apparently it can also come in very quickly. It is a spectacular spot.

We then continued onto the Blue Lagoon (Ed. looks more green in my photo – John!) where there are very steep cliffs. The Blue Lagoon was formed from an abandoned slate quarry which was filled with seawater through a breach in the outer wall. This area is popular with coasteerers and divers. The beach at Abereiddi is accessed by a winding path. The is a large car park here and just inland  a group of houses built for the quarry workers but abandoned in the early 20th century after a flood. The ones that remain are presumably holiday cottages. There are ruins of old buildings around the Blue Lagoon. The rocks of Abereiddi bay are easily eroded Ordovician slates and apparently there are fossils of graptolites in the rock. We will have to have a look next time we go there.

blue lagoon
The Blue Lagoon

We made our way back to Porthgain by an inland route following the yellow footpath arrows. There is a lovely view of the valley up to Llanrhian which was carved by glacial melt-water during  the last ice age.

The total distance walked was 4.5 miles. We did not time ourselves as we had several stops for taking photographs.

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A Walk up Pen y Fan

Pen y Fan is the highest peak in the Southern UK at 886m.This walk was based around the info on the BBC Wales ‘Weatherman Walking‘ series. The walk described there is a slightly longer version of our walk.

To open this walk in Google Earth click here.

Pen y Fan Walk Map
Pen y Fan Map

We started the walk from the car park in Taf Fechan forest walking along the road for a short way and the along a track at the side of the forest. The track then gradually ascends  around Neuadd Reservoir towards Cribyn. After a while you have a choice of  ascending Cribyn or contouring around the side before starting up to the summit of Pen y Fan. The summit is marked with a stone cairn. Unfortunately it was surrounded in mist obscuring the views.

Pen y Fan from Cribyn
Pen y Fan

Then continue south west where again you have the option to go up to Corn Du before continuing in a south easterly direction along the ridge. Eventually after the reservoir there are two steep descents, we chose the second along side the wood. Note that this area can be boggy and the steep descent tricky in icy conditions as we discovered. We then followed the track back to the car parkWe were walking for about 4 hours including stops and covered 8.5 miles. Unfortunately we forgot to take a memory card for the camera so have used a royalty free photo!

 

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A Walk on the Pembrokeshire Coast Porth Clais to St Justinian and Return

This was the first dry pleasant day for a few days so we decided to go for a short circular walk on the Pembrokeshire coast. The drive down took us through St Davids the smallest city in the UK which is quite picturesque.

Porth Clais Harbour
Porth Clais Harbour
Porth Clais to St Justinians Walk
Porth Clais to St Justinians Walk

To see this walk in google Earth click here.The walk started at Porth Clais, which is a small rocky inlet, from  which small fishing boats sail. You can park in the National Trust car park, but be aware that you have to pay during the season. Walk down from the car park to the harbour then take the right hand track up past some old lime kilns. From there we walked along the coastal path towards St Justinian. The track is very well marked  and this section is quite easy with only a couple of short steep ascents. Throughout the walk there are fabulous views of several rocky inlets and quite a wild sea as we had previously had very rough weather.There were several small rocky islands providing good nesting sites for birds and just before St Justinian there is a good view of Ramsey Island which is a RSPB  reserve. See www.ramseyisland.co.uk for more information.We left the coast at Justinian and took a short walk along the lanes, which at this time of year are very quiet, back to the car. It is possible to avoid most of the road by walking across the National Trust land but there are some very wet areas that are best avoided in the winter.The walk is 6.5 miles in total and takes about 3.5 hours with a stop for lunch

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The Black Mountain, Brecon Beacons

Today we walked to the top of the Black Mountain which is to the west of the Brecon Beacons National Park and should not be confused with the Black Mountains in the east of the same Park. Rising to 802 metres (2631 ft) Fan Brycheiniog the summit of the Black Mountain is the third highest top in South Wales. It is a great walk only 35 minutes drive from where we live. The weather was crisp and bright (mostly!). It is approximately 9.5 miles and we have included the details of the walk below.

 

View from The Ridge of the Black Mountain
View from The Ridge of the Black Mountain

 

Black Mountain Walk Map
Black Mountain Walk Map

To view this walk in Google Earth click here.

To reach the start of the walk leave the A40(T) at Trecastle and head south west to Llanddeusant. Then follow the signs to Llyn y Fan Fach. The road turns into a track which turns right over a cattle grid just before the water works/trout farm, proceed along the side of the river and park on the grass verge just by the information sign. (Grid ref. SN 798238). Walk along the track through the valley past the old water installation that is, I think, now a trout farm. As you walk up along the cascading waterfalls views of the cliffs of Bannau Sir Gaer appear ahead. Follow the main track to the right, turning up hill when you reach the resevoir. You follow the track up as it makes it’s way around the western side of Llyn Y Fan Fach and up to the top of the cliffs.When you get to the western side of the lake and almost to the top of the cliffs it is worth stoping to enjoy the view. Below is the lake, Lyn y Fan Fach, while stretching off into the distance are the cliffs of Bannau Sir Gaer with Fan Foel stretching out to the north.

It is now a case of following the ups and downs and in and outs of the cliffs until you reach the trig point on Fan Brycheiniog, the top of the Black Mountain. Below the cliff is another small lake Llyn Y Fan Fawr. This is another good spot to stop and admire the excellent views, especially towards the Brecon Beacons in the east. At this point there are several options for you to choose from for the return. You may prefer to retrace your footsteps and return to your car following the route you walked out on. Or you may choose to carry on a bit further along the cliffs to the “Staircase” which descends the cliffs to the southern shore of the lake. You can then follow the base of the cliffs (this can be boggy) back to Llyn Y Fan Fach.

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